​Obama to host Trump at White House


A triumphant Donald Trump heads to the White House Thursday for talks with President Barack Obama on securing a smooth transition of power and steading nerves after an election that shocked the world.

Anger over the Trump win spilled out on the streets of cities from New York to Los Angeles late Wednesday as chanting protesters lit bonfires and snarled traffic. In one case an orange-headed Trump head was burned in effigy.

Forty-eight hours after Trump’s upset win, the 70-year-old president-elect and Obama will meet in the Oval Office for what could be an awkward meeting as the president-elect looks ahead to the January 20 inauguration.

Trump has questioned whether Obama was born in the United States — a suggestion laden with deep racial overtones — and the Democratic commander-in-chief has described the celebrity businessman as “uniquely unqualified” to be president.

But the last day has seen efforts to bring this deeply divided country together after a brutal two-year battle for the White House that at times appeared more tribal than partisan.

Vanquished Democratic rival Hillary Clinton fought back the bitter disappointment of not becoming America’s first female president to urge Americans to give Trump a chance, at least from the outset.

“We owe him an open mind and the chance to lead,” she said in a concession speech.

Obama, addressing disconsolate staff in the White House Rose Garden, played down the extraordinary Trump win, painting it as democracy being its messy self.

“Sometimes you lose an argument,” he said, adding that all Americans would now be “rooting” for Trump’s success.

“We are Americans first. We’re patriots first. We all want what’s best for this country,” Obama said as staff wiped away tears and pondered whether his administration’s eight years of toil had come to naught.

In the battle for the soul of America, those who helped elect America’s first black president now appear to be in retreat.

Both Obama and Clinton issued a faint but definite warning that Trump must respect institutions and the rule of law if a modicum of goodwill is to hold.

In remarks that would once have seemed unthinkable, the president of the world’s foremost democracy and military power subtly urged his successor to respect the 240-year-old system of governance and its institutions.

“The country,” Obama said “needs a sense of unity, a sense of inclusion, a respect for our institutions, our way of life, rule of law, and a respect for each other.”

White House spokesman Josh Earnest demurred when asked whether Trump would respect the rule of law.

His tone “would seem to suggest that certain basic principles of our democracy are likely to be upheld.”

– Brave new world –

“Likely” is unlikely clear enough for Washington’s partners who see the entire global political order, which hinges on Washington’s moral and military leadership, as cast into doubt.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel appeared to take on the mantle of champion of liberal values and “leader of the free world,” an epithet usually reserved for American presidents.

She warned that “close cooperation” between the two countries must be based on shared democratic values, and reminded Trump of the global responsibility he carries.

“On the basis of these values, I offer close cooperation to the future president of the United States of America, Donald Trump.”

Europe, already beset by financial and social crises and internal divisions, now faces existential questions about its own security. Trump has questioned the US-led NATO’s key collective defense guarantee.

The leaders of America’s closest hemispheric partners, Canada and Mexico, quickly made clear their willingness to work with the new president, offering a message of continuity and stability with their giant neighbor.

Mexico’s President Enrique Pena Nieto reached out to the president-elect, agreeing to a meeting.

– ‘Redemption, not recrimination’ –

The Republican Party leadership, too, embraced their newfound champion.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, who had distanced himself from Trump in the final month of the campaign, pledged to “hit the ground running” and work with him on conservative legislation.

But Ryan also called for healing, saying the bitterly contested race must be followed by a period “of redemption, not a time of recrimination.”

Likewise, Trump called for national reconciliation after Clinton conceded defeat in a result that virtually no poll had dreamed of predicting.

He told a crowd of jubilant supporters early Wednesday in New York “it is time for America to bind the wounds of division” as he pledged to work with Democrats in office.

On Wednesday Trump huddled at Trump Tower in New York with a group of advisers, planning the transition to running the world’s largest economy when he takes office on January 20.

During a bitter campaign that tugged at America’s democratic fabric, the tycoon pledged to deport illegal immigrants, ban Muslims from the country and tear up free-trade deals.

Trump’s campaign message was embraced by a large section of America’s white majority, grown increasingly disgruntled by the scope of social and economic change under Obama.

But it was passionately rejected by Clinton supporters.

Thousands of protesters — in New York, Los Angeles, Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, Portland and other cities — rallied late Wednesday to express shock and anger over Trump’s election. They vowed to oppose divisive views they say helped the Republican billionaire win the White House.

In Washington, several hundred gathered in front of the White House for a candlelight vigil on a damp, chilly evening, criticizing what they called Trump’s racism, sexism and xenophobia, and carrying signs reading “We have a voice!” and “Education for all!”

Some of the most enthusiastic support for Trump came from far-right and nationalist politicians in Europe such as French opposition figure Marine Le Pen, Matteo Salvini of Italy’s Northern League and British euroskeptic Nigel Farage.

Russia’s autocratic leader Vladimir Putin said he wanted to rebuild “full-fledged relations” with the United States, as he warmly congratulated the president-elect.

Source: Vanguard

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​NIGER Delta Avengers congratulate Trump


WARRI- NIGER Delta Avengers, NDA, the militant group at the forefront of the agitation for fiscal federalism in Nigeria and economic emancipation of the Niger Delta region, has commended the President – Elect of the United States of America, Donald J Trump.

The group in a statement by its spokesperson: self-styled Brigadier General Mudoch Agbinibo, asserted: “Your hard fought victory against world establishments is hope for us, the over 30 million oppressed minorities of the Niger – Delta that have being continuously raped and economically colonized because of our God-given resources, over the last six decades, by the Nigerian state and Islamic fundamentalists in power.”

“Mr. President elect of the United States of America sir, we are hoping for a new perfect economic order and relations as it concerns the United States’ critical assets and interest in the Niger Delta.

“Lead the world to a real change not the President Barack Obama change that manipulated a clueless puppet in General Muhammadu Buhari on the people of Nigeria,” NDA said.

Source: Vanguard

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​Buhari congratulates Trump, says he looks forward to working with him

By Levinus Nwabughiogu

ABUJA-President Muhammadu Buhari has congratulated the President-Elect of the United States of America, Mr. Donald Trump on his victory at the polls.

The president also congratulated US citizens on the outcome of the election.

In a statement by the presidential spokesman, Mr. Femi Adesina, president Buhari stated that he looked forward to working with Trump in many areas which included cooperation on many shared foreign policy priorities, such as the fight against terrorism, peace and security, economic growth, democracy and good governance.

“On behalf of the Government and people of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, President Muhammadu Buhari congratulates President-elect Donald Trump on his victory in the United States presidential election.

“President Buhari also congratulates American citizens on the outcome of the election, which was keenly observed by all true lovers of democracy and those who believe in the will of the people.

“The President looks forward to working together with President-elect Trump to strengthen the already established friendly relations between both countries, including cooperation on many shared foreign policy priorities, such as the fight against terrorism, peace and security, economic growth, democracy and good governance.

“As Mr Trump prepares to assume the position of the President of the United States, President Buhari extends his good wishes to him on the onerous task of leading the world’s strongest economy”, the statement stated.

Source: Vanguard

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​PDP will work with U S President-Elect Trump – Ekweremadu

By Henry Umoru

ABUJA – DEPUTY Senate President Ike Ekweremadu said Wednesday that the Nigeria opposition political party, the Peoples Democratic Party, PDP will work assiduously with the President-Elect of the United States of America, USA, Mr. Donald Trump.

In a statement by his Special Adviser, Media, Uche Anichikwu, Senator Ekweremadu who congratulated Trump on his victory in the U.S presidential election, said that emerging democracies, including Nigeria, must emulate the democratic and transparent nature of the U.S election, noting that the will of the people and respect for democratic principles must be allowed at all times and also against the backdrop that the election was not inconclusive.

Ekweremadu, who described the election as “hard-fought”, said the two major contestants gave a good account of themselves, however commended the candidate of the Democratic Party, Mrs. Hilary Clinton, for calling to concede the presidency to her rival and congratulating him on his hard-worn victory.

He said: “Mr. Trump has rightly described the election as historic. But it is not only historic for the U.S, but also for the world. It is an important reminder to the entire world of the true meaning and essence of democracy as government of the people.

“I urge him to work for democracy, global peace and prosperity because the peace and prosperity of America is intrinsic in that of the entire world.

“In particular, I urge better bilateral deals for Nigeria by the incoming Donald Trump presidency. I have no doubt that the people of Nigeria and indeed the Peoples Democratic Party are willing and ready to work with the incoming U.S government for the good of both nations.

“We have many lessons to learn from the American presidential election. It was highly democratic, transparent, peaceful, and free of intimidation, willful manipulations, contrived security scares; and it was absolutely conclusive, even though the ruling party was losing, and eventually lost”

Source: Vanguard

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​Americans bought into our change by electing Trump – APC


The All Progressives Congress (APC) has congratulated Americans for buying into the “change mantra’’ by electing Republican candidate, Mr Donald Trump, who canvassed change in U.S. polity.

The National Chairman of the party, Chief John Odigie-Oyegun, said in Abuja on Wednesday that Americans had spoken by voting Trump, adding that APC could do nothing than to congratulate him for the victory.

Source: Vanguard

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​Nnamdi Kanu’s IPOB congratulates Trump

The Indigenous People of Biafra, IPOB, under the leadership of Nnamdi Kanu, on Wednesday, said the United States of America, USA, will be great again under the Presidency of Donald Trump.

In a statement by its spokesperson, Emma Powerful, the pro-Biafra group congratulated the winner of US Presidential election, stressing that Trump’s victory was an act of God.

The statement reads, “The IPOB under the command structure of Mazi Nnamd Kanu the director of radio and Biafra television thank the good people of America and Republican party who challenged the incumbent president of Barack Obama and the democratic party to a stand still and defeated them to the landslide winning.

“Furthermore, we thank God Almigh who made it to be possible because if it is the wish of some power brokers and some party members in America, it will not be possible.

“Mr Donald Trump passed through so many trials and so many odds from the leadership of the party but God Almighty made it possible for him to become the president of United States of America USA, not man.

“However, he should also remember his promises to the people of America and other people across the globe because USA is going to be great again by the power of God Almighty who selected him from the mist of millions in America.

“Therefore, we wish him successful handover and best luck in his days in the oval office at the white house. We pray to God Almighty to guide and protect USA and Donald Trump the newly elected president. GOD BLESS AMERICA AND DONALD TRUMP.”

Source: VanguardVanguard

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​Nigerian-Americans put brave face to Trump’s triumph

By Emmanuel Aziken in Washington D.C. and Gbenga Oke, Las Vegas

The Nigerian-American community in the United States was Wednesday putting a brave face on the outcome of the Tuesday presidential election in their adopted country, vowing to make the best out of the situation.

The majority of the Nigerian immigrant community had flocked towards the Democratic Party presidential candidate, Mrs. Hilary Clinton on the fear that the anti-immigrant inclination of Mr. Donald Trump, the Republican winner would negative affect the community.

The Nigerian-American community was 16 years ago reported to be about five million.

Among those who spoke were officials and coordinators of the Nigerian Diaspora Union, NDU in the US who on Election Day actively mobilized the community to vote.

The elections were observed by a team of Nigerians including officials of the Independent National Electoral Commission, INEC led by its national chairman, Prof. Mahmood Yakubu, officials of the INEC Committee of the Senate and the House of Representatives and elements of the civil society from Nigeria. Mr. Awal Ibrahim, executive director of the Civil Society Legislative and Advocacy Centre, CISLAC told Vanguard yesterday commended the quick reconciliation of the two major political parties to the Nigerian political class saying that issues that divide during election must be put behind immediately after elections for the good of the country.

Dr. SKC Ogbonnia, Secretary General of the NDU, himself a lifelong Republican who, however, confessed voting for Clinton in line with the resolution of the NDU said yesterday:

“For the Nigerian community, we cannot say it is a total loss. We are a very dynamic community in the United States of America and no matter what happens we will find a way to embrace the change. It is expected that in the Trump presidency, the Supreme Court would be composed of conservative judges who could in a way repeal the Homosexual Marriage Act which conforms to our culture than what you have under Obama and what could have continued under a Clinton presidency had it come to be.

“Secondly, the issue of trade can go either way. A number of Nigerians in America could benefit in Donald Trump’s regime, but at the same time I am worried that his protectionist policy may affect Nigeria.”

Mr. Tayo Kubi who coordinated the move to bring Nigerian-Americans to vote in the Washington, Delaware and Baltimore areas on the East Coast told Vanguard yesterday that democracy was the winner.

“The majority has spoken and this is America, the land of freedom and even the opposition candidate has conceded for peace to reign.

For Mr. Dom Njoku, he simply said “I told you earlier that Trump will win and I will pop champagne. Like I said before the election, virtually everybody is guilty of whatever they said Trump did. And very, unfortunately, the Black community has not gained anything significant under the Obama Presidency. So what do you expect? However, the people have spoken, and we have to move on”.

For Mr. Yomi Balogun, the loss of Hillary Clinton might hunt the blacks and other millions of Americans that have dual citizenship.

He said, “Though the election has been won and lost but I am afraid majority of African Americans might suffer the this loss putting in mind some of the things Mr. Trump stood for in this election. Though I believe some of the blacks staying in this country without valid documents will be most affected.”

Mr. Ibrahim, (Rafsanjani) on his part described the outcome as a big lesson to Nigerian and African politicians that it is a game that one must win.

“If you have the interest of your country and the people at heart it will not matter to you who wins, you will have to work together to sustain the country, not like the way we see some people doing in Nigeria and in Africa.

“It is about the nation, and the people have done the election, it has come, and it has gone and what is important is that they are putting heads together to protect the interest of their country. This is a lesson that every Nigerian politician should learn; they should learn to work together whether they win or lose an election.”

Source: Vanguard

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